How to do a personal SWOT analysis to Enhance Learning Goals and Objectives

One of the hardest things to do alone is to effectively carry out a skills self-evaluation before setting up clear objectives in a Personal Learning Plan (PLP).

Knowing where one is at a given time is not an easy task due to a variety of reasons, one being the difficulty in being objective with oneself – the ability to take a step back and see things as they are, without being overshadowed by emotive aspects.

It also depends a lot on how we are as a person:

a confident person and a person with lower self-esteem, will have diametrically opposed difficulties in evaluating themselves both realistically and objectively.

Embarking on this task, alone is quite a challenging undertaking.

A SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) analysis can really help in gaining clarity and setting realistic objectives and is a simple tool that can be used alone, but which can be further exploited with the help of a coach.

The SWOT analysis is a simple matrix as shown below:

EXTERNAL INTERNAL
Strengths Weaknesses
Opportunities Threats

 

The idea is to start out by looking at where you are now in terms of your goals, aims and objectives and to discover where effort needs to be put in order to reach your goals.

The process is reflective and involves a certain degree of metacognition (thinking about your own thinking) in order to be able to effectively accomplish the task.

In order to demonstrate the concept, let’s take Claire, a working mum, who wants to progress in her job – this is just to illustrate an example – it could be any subject and a SWOT can also be used in other contexts.

A SWOT is great for strategic planning and project feasibility studies as the focus is largely a 360° approach and very analytical, but one which entails action steps and change as a consequence.

Claire has a strong desire to progress in her job, but she has never really been able to succeed due to many barriers which systematically get in the way, and which she cannot seem to surmount, at least on her own.

She has never really been obsessively nor aggressively ambitious and has always put her family before herself, but now wants to move to a more interesting job with more responsibility.

When embarking on a SWOT, it is easy to fall into the trap of being able to fill the Weaknesses section easily and then be short of Strengths – it is sometimes dialectic, in as much as a Weakness can also be an Opportunity as a Threat can also become a Strength.

She has decided to start work with a coach to be able to get things moving as she has never quite got there alone and feels that this is a good opportunity for her, both in her life and in her career.

Her coach has asked her to fill in the SWOT matrix, which she does before they meet again.

STRENGTHS and WEAKNESSES are known as Internal elements that either create or reduce value, whilst OPPORTUNITIES and THREATS are known as External elements that can form barriers to learning but that are often not fully controlled by the learner.

The questions to ask are:What am I good at / what qualities or skills do I possess?

STRENGTHS

What are the qualities / skills that I need to develop that I am aware of ?

WEAKNESSES

How can I use my STRENGTHS to overcome my weaknesses, to move into new areas of learning?

OPPORTUNITIES

What hinders or prevents me from reaching my goals?

THREATS

STRENGTHS

CommunicationPunctualTelephone mannerOrganisedConscientiousExperience in the companyMotivated

WEAKNESSES

IT SkillsForeign Language skillsTime ManagementManagement skillsLack of experience of team management Gets easily stressedLack of self-confidence

OPPORTUNITIES

More responsibilitiesVariety in new jobLearn new skillsHigher salaryCompany carBe part of the decision making process

THREATS

Lives far from workDifficulty to travelFamily commitmentsAge (45 years old)

 

Coaching a person through a SWOT analysis is both a negotiated and an awareness process, predominately made up of questioning, but essentially, it must be free of judgement or preconceived ideas.

The coach decides to use another tool to complement the SWOT process, a Confrontation Matrix, which is used to offset the Strengths with Opportunities and Threat, and the Weaknesses with the same, as shown below:

EXTERNAL /INTERNAL OPPORTUNITIES THREATS
STRENGTHS ATTACK STRATEGY ADJUSTMENT STRATEGY
WEAKNESSES DEFENCE STRATEGY SURVIVAL STRATEGY

 

In the SWOT matrix, the coach helps the learner to offset STRENGTHS with OPPORTUNITIES / STRENGTHS with THREATS and consequently, WEAKNESSES with OPPORTUNITIES / WEAKNESSES with THREATS in order to produce a set of action steps or a PLP to help the learer progress to the next step, which, in this case, will be a set of decisions and plans to move into the new job.

The value of a SWOT is that it is a way of seeing where a learner is at a given point in time and where they need to be in the future.

It can help build a clear Learning Action Plan with specific goals, timescales and measurement variables built in.

If you intend using a SWOT analysis there are some do’s and don’ts to be aware of in order to guarantee the success of the process:

1. Don’t expect people to be able to fill in the matrix without a clear briefing of how it will be used and the type of elements that it should include.

2. Ensure that there is adequate thought and process time to be able to complete the matrix.

3. Ensure that the learner understands that the SWOT is ephemeral. That it could be filled-in today and change tomorrow. People, contexts and situations are constantly in a state of flux.

4. Ensure that there are clear guidelines and boundaries on confidentiality. The only sharing is done by the learner – who can invite the coach to be present if they want to debrief their managers on the process and outcomes.

5. Be aware that people with low self-esteem will naturally include more weaknesses than strengths – they will need help evoking their qualities, skills and qualities more than confident people.

6. The process should be viewed as a positive and fun process, with benefits clearly set-out for the learner.

7. Remember that the coach will learn a great deal from the process, which can be used as another building-block in the coach’s development.

8. There needs to be a bond of trust between learner and coach, built before embarking on a SWOT

© 2012, admin. All rights reserved.

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